No cancellation fees. No hassle. Book Now, stay relaxed. Read More

Accommodation in Nepal

If you wish to live in Nepalese style and become acquainted with Nepalese culture, the best option is to stay with a native family. Unique Adventure International offers a bilingual and well-experienced team that can assist you in finding a suitable host family as well as a placement for your convenience.

The homestay program allows any guests who want to stay with a Nepali family as paying guest to do so. Guests must eat whatever (of course sanitary food) the family eats in their kitchen, dwell in their guest rooms, and participate in celebrations such as birthdays, sacred rites, and marriage ceremonies.

The homestay program is appropriate for students, family travelers, and anybody who wants to live in Nepal. This program is also beneficial for individuals who want to learn Nepali or other local languages, traditions, or a specific ritual with the locals. The homestay program is the most convenient approach to enjoying foreign culture by sharing your own culture, traditions, and experiences.

During their visit, guests can pick between a single or double room, as well as a B/B plan, half board, or self-catering. Rooms are basic, with no associated bathrooms. The typical Nepali family begins their day by cleaning up their home, which is especially important for the mother, daughter, or daughter-in-law. You will also be able to study Nepalese culinary traditions and cuisine recipes here.

Some trekking paths are designed to encourage homestay programs in particular. Trekkers/travelers can stay in local residences when hiking on certain paths. The goal of these programs is to accommodate tourists for only one or two nights, with home stays serving as an alternative to 'hotel & lodge' tea house excursions.

 

Nepalese toilets (During Your Trek)

Toilets in Nepal, like many other Asian countries, are often holes on the ground that you kneel over and flush with a jug of water. The idea is to squat and relax down till your calves are resting! You're undoubtedly fit enough to squat low if you're fit enough to journey!

The cleanliness of restrooms varies greatly. Some are spotless, while others will make your stomach churn. But when you have to go, you have to go. So be bold and get it over with as soon as possible.

However, several homestay programs in urban and sometimes rural locations provide long-term lodging. We have foreign citizens staying with us for more than a month. It all depends on what you want and need.

Outside of the peak seasons (late September to mid-November and late February to late March), or when things are abnormally calm, prices might drop by up to fifty percent: a simple "discount paunchha?" ("any discount?") can frequently enough. Official tariffs often do not include government and service taxes (13 percent and 10%, respectively); rates are commonly given as "plus," implying that both must be applied. Offers offered on the spot at conventional guesthouses, on the other hand, are usually all-in – double-check.

Most establishments provide a variety of rooms, ranging from inexpensive, shared-bathroom boxes to en suites with a/c and TVs. Single rooms are often half or two-thirds the price of a double room. Hotels and guesthouses accept reservations, and they are frequently required during peak seasons, local festivities, or if you arrive late at night.



NEPAL'S ACCOMMODATION COST

Prices vary greatly depending on where you stay and when you stay. Trekking hotels may be found for a few dollars per night, but a safari lodge in Chitwan can cost up to $250 per night.

Lodging in Nepal is generally quite cheap, with the most prevalent kind of accommodation, guest houses, charging between $5 and $35 per night.

Because Kathmandu and Pokhara have the most lodging, their costs may be slightly more than in other regions of the nation.

Teahouses and hiking lodges in the highlands are inexpensive, but owing to the altitude and circumstances, they are relatively basic. In a shared room, don't expect much more than a wooden single bed.

Prices might lower if you visit outside of peak season, so always inquire if a discount is available.

 

Lodges 

Off-the-beaten-path lodges cater to Nepali tourists and are commonly referred to as "hotel and lodge" (the "hotel" part signifies there's somewhere to dine). Some are somewhat comfy, but most of the time you'll have to settle for something fairly unsanitary. The norm is bare concrete flooring, cold-water showers, and stinky squat toilets, yet you'll seldom spend more than Rs350. Bring your sleeping bag liner to guard against bedbugs and lice, as well as earplugs to drown out the expected noise. In the Terai, look for a room with a mosquito net and a functional fan (or air conditioning).

This isn't to imply Nepali lodges should be avoided. The most satisfying settings are often the most rudimentary - where you sit by a smoky fire and dine with your hosts. Trekking lodges on less-traveled routes can take this form, however, there are some surprisingly pleasant ones out there as well.

 

Guesthouses

Guesthouses are the name given to several tourist-oriented places to stay in Nepal. This category includes anything from rustic flophouses to luxurious modest hotels. Most establishments have a variety of rooms at various costs, as well as dorm beds on occasion. Those that cater to visitors often do so efficiently: most innkeepers speak great English and can arrange anything from laundry to trekking/porter rental.

Despite claims to the contrary, you can not expect consistent hot water (many places rely on solar panels) or uninterrupted electricity (power cuts are a daily occurrence, though some establishments have generators). If you want continual hot water, inquire about the guesthouse's water-heating system; the best option is "geyser" (pronounced "geezer"), which refers to an electric immersion heater or backup.

All but the most basic guesthouses will have a safe, and the most upscale establishments may have security boxes in each room.

 

Guesthouses on a budget

Kathmandu and Pokhara each have their tourism districts, with tight rivalry among inexpensive guesthouses ensuring exceptional value. All save the most basic accommodations in these enclaves have hot running water (although infrequently), flush toilets, foam beds, and clean linens and blankets. Expect plainer and scruffier lodgings elsewhere in Nepal. Most guesthouses also have a roof patio or garden, a phone, and a television. However, they are rarely heated, making them exceedingly frigid in the winter. Most inexpensive hotels charge Rs300–1000 for a room, and the quality varies greatly; the lowest alternatives frequently feature communal toilets.

 

Budget-friendly inns

For lack of a better name, mid-range guesthouses are becoming increasingly popular. Rooms are often larger and have a fan (or perhaps a/c), as well as a phone and a television. In the restrooms, toilet paper is given, and the hot water is more consistent. In the winter, the nicer ones will have a portable electric heater. A double room of this type would cost between Rs1000 and Rs3500. Most mid-range guesthouses list their pricing in dollars, but you may also pay with rupees and, in some cases, credit cards.

 

Resorts and hotels

The more costly hotels and resorts are difficult to generalize about. Some demand a high price to keep you away from the Nepal you came to see, while others provide one-of-a-kind experiences. Prices for international-style features start around $50 but expect to pay $100 or more per night for a very upscale establishment. This book also suggests a few smaller resort hotels that provide something distinctive, such as a stunning view or historic architecture. Jungle hotels and tented camps within Terai animal reserves are usually the most costly alternatives, asking $250 or more per night.

 

Homestays and village stays

A rising number of programs allow guests to spend the night in private houses in rural towns off the beaten path. Village stays (also known as village tourism or homestays) provide a unique chance for comfortable cultural immersion and have the potential to disperse tourists and extend the economic benefits of tourism to rural communities. A tour operator contracts with an entire village to accommodate and entertain guests; rooms in local houses are outfitted with bathrooms and a few tourist-style comforts, host families are trained to prepare meals that will not upset delicate Western constitutions, and a guide accompanies the guests to interpret, if necessary.

There are various village tourism programs, including one conducted by the respected Pokhara-based Child Welfare Scheme in Chisapani, southeast of Pokhara near Rup Tal, and others in and around Tansen and Bandipur. A few language institutes and other organizations in Kathmandu and Patan also conduct homestays with local families.




ACCOMMODATION BY CAMPING OR TENTING

Camping is frequently given on hiking or climbing routes when teahouse accommodations are not easily accessible. Despite the availability of accommodations for adventure and entertainment, some hikers prefer camping or tenting accommodation. During this time, you will be given a 2-man tent, nice sleeping mats, kitchen equipment, and food. The STEP ON HIMALAYA staff will assist you in erecting the tent or camp towards the end of the day. Fresh veggies are readily accessible in the area. Food in cans is also available. You must plan for this nomadic experience and notify us in advance so that the preparations and staff for the cooking crew (chef, kitchen boy, porters) and the Trekking guide may be managed appropriately according to the size of the party. This style of lodging allows you to have a unique mountain experience.

 

Everest and Annapurna Trekking Accommodation

The Everest Base Camp Trek, as well as the major hiking trails of Annapurna, Langtang, and Manaslu, provide various lodges for your meals and accommodation. Light blankets are provided in the rooms at these resorts. However, we strongly advise you to bring your sleeping bag. These hotels feature modest rooms that provide minimal accommodation when trekking in the Himalayas. Please do not anticipate high-end accommodations, especially in the highlands. Although the lodges have their own set of standards. If you prefer luxury accommodations, please choose our Everest Luxury Expedition, which includes exclusively luxury accommodations during the trek.

The lavatory is located outside of the main structure, and the shower water is solar heated, which means you may expect pleasant warm showers or pay for a gas shower. There is no running water accessible during the winter and snowy season, but they may supply buckets of hot water to have a shower fantasy in the Himalayas. We need to order our meals as early as possible since they provide fresh dishes created particularly for you. In the event of an emergency, they are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week. Laundry facilities are only accessible in a few places on the Everest Base Camp Trek, so make sure you carry enough clothing for your Stunningly Beautiful Trek for A Lifetime Experience!

However, for Luxury Trekking such as Everest Base Camp, Everest View Trek, Annapurna, Dhampus Sarangkot, and Chandragiri, Luxury Comfort Lodges will be given. The accommodation facilities, meals, and items in these luxury hotels and lodges will differ from their standard.

 

Furthermore, community lodge and home stay accommodations are available at Mohare Danda Community Trek and Khopra Trekking, as well as Chitre High Bridge Trekking.




Location

Snacks

Wifi

Charging per hour

Hot shower

Soft drinks

Boiled water

Phakding

200

500

350

400

250

150

Namche Bazaar

200

500

250

500

300

150

Tengboche

200

Everest Link

300

600

400

200

Dingboche

150

Everest Link

600

500

300

250

Pheriche

200

Everest Link

350

500

450

200

Lobuche

300

Everest Link

600

700

400

300

Gorak Shep

500

Everest Link

500

700

400

400



Room Amenities in Nepal Trekking Accommodation

Almost every accommodation on the walk has two single beds that can sleep two people. Because of the limited number of lodges, if you are a single trekker, you may need to share your room with someone else (same-sex) in some places, such as Lobuche and Gorakshep of Everest Base Camp Trek, Throng Phedi, and Throng High Camp of Annapurna Circuit Trekking, Macchapuchre and Annapurna Base Camp of Annapurna Base Camp Trekking, and Mardi Base Camp of Mardi.

 

Private Rooms / Single Supplement / Hotel Upgrade

If you prefer private accommodations, a single supplement, or an upgrade in hotel quality for your vacation, please send us a note with the adjustments you wish to make. On special request, a single supplement or hotel upgrade will be offered at an extra fee.

 

Sustainable Tourism 

While tourism is an important element of Nepal's economy, it does not always benefit the nation. The Responsible Travel Nepal program gives training and assistance to Nepali tourist enterprises – hotels and resorts, trekking and adventure organizations, travel agents, and so on – to encourage them to guarantee their operations and management practices adhere to sustainable tourism principles. Importantly, it underlines the commercial benefits of implementing these concepts, assisting enterprises in developing relationships with operators and travelers, improving marketing efforts, and expanding their operations. The website of Responsible Travel Nepal (w rt-responsibletravel.com) gives information on the member firms and is a good place to start when organizing activities in Nepal.

 

How are the restrooms on the trail?

Some of the lower lodges have clean western-style flush toilets, but as you ascend higher, lengthy drop toilets that are a hole in the ground become increasingly popular. Some are superior to others. Although every lodge sells toilet paper, it is recommended that you have some with you at all times. If you need to use the restroom while on the trip, you can stop at any of the other lodges or businesses along the way. Do not hide behind bushes or leave used toilet paper lying around. Most indoor toilets contain a pail for old toilet paper, which is crucial because all waste ends up in vast pits underneath, many of which seep into the river system. Paper is often burned.

 

What about trash on the journey?

There is currently no recycling on the trails in Nepal, however, there is a recycling plant in Namche Bazaar. The Everest Base Camp Trek currently attracts over 20,000 visitors each year, resulting in a massive quantity of garbage. Many people simply throw it on the ground, while others use the lodge bins or burn it in the stoves, but recycling is not yet a viable alternative.

We do not want people to leave trash wherever, but we prefer that all of our clients store their trash in a container or bag and carry it back to Kathmandu. During a journey, one person usually creates less than 1 kg of garbage from candy wrappers and other items, so it would not be a hardship. Please assist us with our policy of packing your trash.

 

What about water to drink when trekking in Nepal?

Bottled water is available for purchase, however, we do not advocate using single-use plastic bottles. Please keep in mind that cheap Nalgene water bottles purchased in Nepal are not genuine Nalgene and quickly split when filled with hot water!

You have the option of ordering boiling water from the lodge kitchen or treating the tap water. River water is typically full of glacial silt and may be polluted with animal urine and bathroom run-off, so do not drink it. The tap water at the lodges is piped from high up, away from rivers and pristine glaciers, so it is better, but it still has to be treated.

One method is to utilize iodine drops (3 per liter) purchased in Kathmandu (locally known as Lugols solution, accessible in stores in Thamel) and flavor it with Tang powder purchased locally. You might also try chlorine-based pills, however, they leave a taste in the water. You could also buy a Steripen, which utilizes UV light to destroy bacteria, although it's a bit fragile to transport. Aquaprove, a water purifying tablet that uses cutting-edge technology, is our favorite. It's light, simple to use, has no aftertaste, and most importantly, it kills all microorganisms in contaminated water.

 

How is trekking equipment transported in Nepal?

Large expeditions employ yaks to transport all of the climbing equipment to a mountain's base camp, which is a classic depiction of how goods are transported in the Himalayas. People carry all of the equipment and trekkers' clothes on shorter trekking peak expeditions and treks. In reality, as you travel across Nepal, you will notice that people carry almost anything, from wood and stone to all the products on sale in stores, mattresses, beer, water, and even old people.

Nowadays, you won't see many Sherpas lugging things on their backs; instead, they'll be guiding or operating teahouses and lodges.

Other castes, such as the Rai, who live in harmony with the Sherpas, are utilized to carry baggage. They hold the sacks with a tumpline over their brow, and the accepted weight of a bag is around 15kg.