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Accommodation in Everest

The Everest area is regarded as one of the world's top trekking routes. This journey is on the bucket list of hikers all over the world, and as a result, a great number of trekkers go to Nepal. Previously dominated by tea houses and rudimentary lodges, the Everest region is now thriving with hotels and lodges that do not want to sacrifice comfort.

Everest is no longer only a backpacker's destination. Luxury hikers and visitors may now enjoy the splendor of the 8000-meter giants from the comfort of high luxury. Travel and travel firms provide a variety of luxury packages, such as helicopter excursions to Everest Base Camp and exquisite breakfasts at five-star hotels.

Allow your wish list and budget to guide the sort of lodging you choose for your stay at the top of the globe. You can personalize your trip to the Everest region to your preferences. Adrenaline-pumping excitement and luxury do not typically mix, but Everest is closing the gap. The Everest Base Camp (EBC) trip is still extremely challenging, but you can now add a touch of luxury to it.

Thagnak, Dzongla, Pheriche, Lobuche, and Gorakshep are high-altitude communities with modest amenities. However, Lukla, Phakding, Namche Bazaar, Thame, Gokyo, and Dingboche provide the finest in alpine luxury. As premium mountain hotel brands, Everest Summit Lodge in Monjo, Hotel Everest View in Syangboche, and Yeti Mountain Home in Thame are gaining appeal. Given the difficulties of the topography, luxury may appear to be too much to ask for in these regions. It is now a reality.

There are a few mid-range lodges and simple tea houses. These lodges and tea houses provide you with a place to sleep as well as hot food to satisfy your daily calorie requirements.

 

  1. Tea Houses

Previously, tea houses were the only places in the highlands where trekkers could stop and eat. They remain one of the most popular forms of lodging. These tea shops are usually run by locals and are frequently located in the same house where the inhabitants live.

Tea houses are reasonably priced and provide modest accommodations with twin beds or dorms. Other trekkers share a shower area and toilets. Tea houses provide identical services at comparable prices, and the food selection is uniform throughout. It is customary to dine at the same tea house where you are staying. Locals make the most of their money by providing full board services.

A tea-house is the last place you'd look for luxury. Tea houses feature simple rooms that include a wooden bed, foam pad, pillow, and blanket. You can always request an additional blanket for a fee. Typically, an electric blanket costs USD 20. Normal ones are slightly less expensive.

The majority of tea houses offer solar or gas-heated showers. Tea houses charge between USD 2 and USD 6 for a hot shower. Cold showers are provided at no cost. For less money, you can acquire a pail of warm water to clean yourself.

Tea houses provide a heated eating space and a limited food selection with Nepali and continental specialties. A lunch costs between USD 5 and USD 10. The meal will not taste as it does in Kathmandu restaurants, but it will satisfy your calorie needs for a long climb.

 

Other Amenities at Tea Houses

 

  1. Mid-range lodges

There are more amenities as the number of tourists increases. This is especially true for hiking options in the Everest area. Various lodges and motels will be available to you throughout your Everest Base Camp journey. Mid-range lodges, which are more elegant and convenient than tea houses, are becoming more popular in the Everest region. They are the ideal combination of adequate amenities and a cheap price.

Lodges are larger and better managed than tea shops. These mid-priced lodges include well-equipped dining areas, a wider variety of culinary options, comfy bedrooms with soft mattresses, and an adjoining bathroom with a hot shower. They charge somewhat more than tea establishments for all of these services, but they are relatively inexpensive. Rooms with these services range in price from Rs 500 to 1000 (USD 5 to 10), depending on the season. The meal costs about the same as it does at tea shops.

 

  1. Luxury Hotels

The arrival of fancy new hotels and lodges on the Everest Base Camp journey is rather startling. Towns like Lukla, Namche, and Dingboche are reminiscent of Kathmandu's coffee shops and bakeries. This is your best option if you don't want to sacrifice comfort and luxury.

The premium hotels in the Everest area, such as Yeti Mountain Home in Kongde and Hotel Everest View in Syangboche, will astound you. You may take a helicopter to a luxurious brunch with a view of Mt. Everest. Some of the premium alternatives are the Everest Summit Lodge in Monjo, the Hotel Everest View in Syangboche, and the Yeti Mountain Home hotel chain. Among these, Hotel Everest View set a Guinness World Record for being the world's tallest hotel (13,000 ft).

The majority of luxury hotels are managed by hoteliers and corporate entities. They provide comfortable accommodations as well as an excellent dining experience. An electric mattress pad, heavy blankets, and a room heater can also be requested. These are not cheap and may exceed the budget of most budget visitors. They charge roughly USD 200 per night for each guest, which includes breakfast, charging, and WiFi.

 

Do I need to Book Lodges in Advance?

The straightforward answer is YES! However, it is mostly dependent on the season in which you walk to Everest Base Camp. It is usually better to be safe than sorry and ask for a room. During the off-season, it would be easier to find a home (from December end to February & June to September). Because not all lodges are open during the off-season, especially in the winter, finding the best amenities would be difficult. Booking ahead of time ensures your comfort over the long and chilly nights of the mountain in any season.

When going during peak seasons (March to May & mid-September to mid-December), the first thing you should do is reserve your accommodations. If you go via an agency, they will handle all of the logistics, leaving you with one less thing to worry about. If you wish to hike on your own, renting lodges in the Everest Region online ahead of time is the best option.

Another option is to speak with your guide or the lodge where you are staying about booking a room at the next destination. Because the lodge owners would most likely notify their family or close friends' lodges, your lodging options may be limited. At the very least, you may rest assured that you will have somewhere to stay.

 

What kind of services can I expect in Everest Base Camp Trek?

 

Rooms

The money you pay and the altitude you are at have a direct relationship with the quality of the accommodations. Up to Namche Bazaar, tea houses and lodges have electricity, adjoining bathrooms with hot showers, western toilets, and WiFi. As you get higher, the rooms just become places to sleep.

The majority of accommodations in the Everest region are twin share. There are also single rooms and dorms available. Typically, there are two single beds and a table. Rooms are often insulated with wood, and the floors may be covered with plain PVC carpet.

Rooms often include hooks and, in some cases, shelves. Padlocks are supplied for locking doors. However, there may be times when you are given a room without one. Carrying a little padlock will come in handy if you need it.

 

Water

In the highlands, water is a crucial and life-saving beverage. You will need to rehydrate yourself since you will be losing a lot of fluids through perspiration, urine, and breath. During the hike, dehydration might become a severe issue. Some people encourage drinking a certain amount of water in liters. However, experts recommend that you stay hydrated rather than consuming a certain amount of water. Keep an eye out for indicators of dehydration; you should not feel thirsty, and your urine should not be murky or yellow. Always remember that water is the primary line of defense against altitude sickness. Keep hydrated!

The most crucial factor is the purity of the water you consume. Never drink water straight from the faucet. Before consuming, treat your water with purification pills or solutions. Bottled water is also available, although it will cost you Rs 100 to 400, as opposed to Rs 20 in Kathmandu. Boiling water is the safest to drink and maybe refilled in tea shops and hotels. They would charge you between Rs 100 and Rs 400 for boiling water. Hot water will also protect you from common colds, coughs, and sore throats. Carry a water bottle with you and replenish it as needed.

 

Connectivity

Mobile connections are strong in lower locations but weaken as you ascend. It does, however, operate quite well in Gorakshep, the final resting station before reaching Everest Base Camp. Cellular mobile coverage is available in Phakding, Namche, and Tengboche. NTC and Ncell will both operate in the Everest area.

 

Internet/WiFi

For a nominal fee of USD 5 to 10, most tea houses and lodges offer WiFi access that may be utilized in different places. Everest Link provides the WiFi service, and lodges supply you with a prepaid card for volume-based Internet that you may use to stay connected. They have many packages available, such as USD 20 for 10 GB of data good for 30 days. You may brag about your breathtaking journey utilizing the Internet in the highest altitudes on the planet.

 

Hot Shower

A hot shower is one of the nicest parts of the journey. Showers at tea houses are either gas or solar-powered. After a long day of sweaty hiking, taking a hot shower is pleasant, and your body feels a lot lighter. A hot shower will cost you between USD 2 and $6, but it is well worth it. If you dare, you can take a free freezing cold shower.

 

Charging your device

It is critical to keep your electronic gadgets charged and operational. It is especially important if one of the goals of your journey is to capture images. You may charge your gadgets for $2 to $3 per device, and the power bank costs $10. If your room has a socket, you may charge your device for free. However, it is uncommon in areas where the lodges are solar-powered, particularly at high altitudes. If you are on a tight budget, carrying a portable solar charger will help you save money.

 

Cleanliness

The Everest Base Camp climb is a well-established hiking route with quite excellent amenities, so hygiene is not a major concern. While not all accommodations are similarly clean, the majority of them are fairly kept and sanitary, given the remoteness and cost of maintaining the amenities. All of the rooms have dustbins, and the toilets are kept clean to some extent. Hotels in Gorakshep, on the other hand, are a bit of a compromise in terms of room amenities and toilet cleanliness.

The trails are somewhat dusty. To avoid the dreaded Khumbu cough, it is advised to cover your mouth and nose. The management of solid waste has greatly improved the garbage problem. Along the walk, there are dustbins. Please keep in mind that starting in 2020, plastics will be prohibited on the Everest trip. Remember the adage, "Leave nothing but footsteps and take nothing but images."

 

Toilets

In high-altitude resorts, toilet facilities are basic. In regions like Namche, Tengboche, Dingboche, and Gokyo, mid-range hotels have connected restrooms. The restrooms in other locations are more rudimentary. Some lodges have managed to accommodate both western-style and squat toilets. While some have outhouses with pits on the floor that are utilized when everything is frozen in the winter. However, none of the toilets are equipped with a roll of toilet paper. This is the most important item to bring because buying toilet paper in the mountains will be prohibitively expensive.

 

Is there an Internet facility available in the Everest Region?

The simple answer is yes. And internet access is readily available in the majority of campgrounds. Cellular service is generally reliable at lower elevations, up to Tengboche. Beyond that, you'll have to rely on the hotel's WiFi, which is primarily billed via Everest Link. There is cellular access in Gorakshep, where you may use 3G, however, it is not always reliable because the connection is often poor. You may also choose between prepaid internet plans for the location where you are staying and plans that function in numerous locations.

The cost of Internet access via the Everest link ranges from NRS 500 to NRS 3000, depending on data consumption.

 

Are hotels open throughout the year?

Locals do not live in all of the settlements in the Everest region all year. During the winter (December to February), most people travel to warmer locations and then return to higher altitudes during the hiking season. However, with the growth of tourism, tea shops and lodges are now open all year. Although there are fewer lodges operating during the busy winter season, you will not be without shelter even in severe weather. Just remember to reserve your spot so that you have a place to relax and hot meals ready for you. Lodges are completely active during the months other than winter.

 

Do I need to carry a sleeping bag?

During the fall and winter nights, tea houses and lodges are exceedingly chilly. Although some lodges provide a fresh quilt and electric blanket, this may not be sufficient during harsh weather, particularly at higher elevations. A sleeping bag will keep you warm on the coldest evenings, so include it on your Everest Region packing list.

The bed and bedding may not be as clean as you would want. As a result, the greatest place to sleep is inside your sleeping bag. For added warmth, utilize the included bed and quilt in conjunction with your sleeping bag. To remain warm on chilly evenings, select a sleeping bag certified for – 10°C (14°F) or – 20°C (-4°F).

If you don't want to purchase a sleeping bag for this journey, you may rent one in Kathmandu or Namche Bazaar. You should only buy an appropriate sleeping bag if you are certain you will use it again.



What are the hotel experiences like in:

Lukla

Because most flights from Kathmandu to Lukla arrive early in the morning, relatively few travelers spend their first night in Lukla. The majority choose to go right on the route and proceed to the first halt at Phakding or Namche. That is not to say that there are no lodges in Lukla. There are numerous, and the accommodations are typically far superior to those found further up in the mountains. There are also several excellent hotels to choose from, albeit they are slightly more pricey than the lodges. The amenities are far superior to those of the trail's tea lodges, with several offering groomed lawns, balcony rooms, and patio dining for its visitors, not to mention that always-welcome hot shower.

Because Lukla is near the trailhead for the EBC trip, it receives the first of the imported products and foods that arrive in the Khumbu region for the Everest lodges, and the meals are delicious, substantial food at a very cheap price. You can get practically everything, from curry to pizza, as well as local foods if you desire them. You might not want to see Dahl Bhat again after two weeks of trekking. The lodges are also handy for recruiting porters, and many of the local porters who are not at the airport meeting the aircraft may be seen hawking for employment at the lodges.

 

Phakding

This little settlement is three to four hours from Lukla and five to six hours from Namche Bazaar. Because most flights into Lukla arrive in the morning, many trekkers (about 90%) prefer to hike straight through and spend the night in Phakding before continuing on to Namche Bazaar to acclimate. Phakding has numerous hotels on both sides of the river to accommodate everyone, including a Yeti Mountain Home for those on a tighter budget who like a little more comfort.



Detailed introduction of lodges and food

It may seem snobbish to refer to certain village enterprises as "hotels," yet the most popular Nepali word for restaurant or dining facility translates as "hotel." Because the term hotel has been taken, Nepalese people refer to a sleeping place or inn as a lodge. In the highlands of Nepal, a hotel may give dining but not a place to sleep, but a lodge always provide housing. Many innkeepers differentiate their services by naming their facilities Hotel & Lodge. In truth, you can nearly always find food and lodging at any trailside facility.

As the trekking sector has grown, amenities have improved, and there is now a comprehensive network of lodges serving key routes. Most motels in the highlands are family-run businesses that began in the living room and evolved as more hikers arrived. Many lodges now provide individual rooms for visitors, but at some, the innkeepers dine and sleep in the same structure, and frequently in the same room, that tourists use. Trekking lodge revenue has become the primary source of income in many hill communities since the 1970s.

Pavement cafés, sunrooms, private rooms, indoor Western-style restrooms, and electric lighting are plentiful. Lodges battle for your stomach's attention with dishes such as cake, pie, pizza, steaks, tacos, enchiladas, and spaghetti bolognaise. There are several wonderful lodges in the hills, but there are many more that are subpar. The hot shower may be a pail of tepid water, and the toilet could be a latrine behind the hotel. The private chamber might be a wooden jail with nothing but a bed, mattress, and a curtain in place of a door. However, when contrasted to camping out on the path in a tent in the freezing cold after a hard day of trekking, even these look extravagant.



Lukla

Because most flights from Kathmandu to Lukla arrive early in the morning, relatively few travelers spend their first night in Lukla. The majority choose to go right on the route and proceed for the first halt at Phakding or Namche. That is not to say that there are no lodges in Lukla. There are numerous, and the accommodations are typically far superior to those found further up in the mountains. There are also several excellent hotels to choose from, albeit they are slightly more pricey than the lodges. The amenities are far superior to those of the trail's tea lodges, with several offering groomed lawns, balcony rooms, and patio dining for its visitors, not to mention that always-welcome hot shower.

Because Lukla is near the trailhead for the EBC trip, it receives the first of the imported products and foods that arrive in the Khumbu region for the Everest lodges, and the meals are delicious, substantial food at a very cheap price. You can get practically everything, from curry to pizza, as well as local foods if you desire them. You might not want to see Dahl Bhat again after two weeks of trekking. The lodges are also handy for recruiting porters, and many of the local porters who are not at the airport meeting the aircraft may be seen hawking for employment at the lodges.

 

Phakding

This little settlement is three to four hours from Lukla and five to six hours from Namche Bazaar. Because most flights into Lukla arrive in the morning, many trekkers (about 90%) prefer to hike straight through and spend the night in Phakding before continuing on to Namche Bazaar to acclimate. Phakding has numerous hotels on both sides of the river to accommodate everyone, including a Yeti Mountain Home for those on a tighter budget who like a little more comfort.

Food in Phakding lodges is comparable to that in Lukla and is similarly priced. This is the true beginning of the tea lodge route to EBC, and it is most likely where you will get your first dish of Dahl Bhat. This wonderful, invigorating, satisfying dish will be your basic diet for the next two weeks, which is fortunate because everyone makes it differently.

 

Namche Bazaar

Namche Bazaar is the largest commercial town in the Everest Region and is well-known across the globe as a destination for Everest summiteers. With more than 90% of trekkers traveling through Namche staying three nights (two on the way up to acclimate and one on the way back), it's no wonder that there are a plethora of hotels, approximately 50 in fact, with a range of pricing ranging from basic to luxurious.

Namche is the last stop on the road to EBC where you may find finer lodges that serve decent meals in various genres at a fair price, but slightly higher than in Lukla. There are also a few eateries in the settlement that cater to hikers and visitors visiting the area. From Namche onward, costs begin to rise and lodgings become more basic, which is to be expected, so take advantage of Namche's relative elegance.

 

Tengboche

Tengboche is famed for its monastery, which is the biggest in the Khumbu Region and is located at 3,867 meters. The monastery's panoramic vistas are breathtaking. With just 5 hotels in Tengboche and many visitors staying overnight to attend morning prayers at the monastery, it may get busy during the high season. Tengboche also has additional lodges and many small eateries that serve trek visitors. However, food is slightly more costly than in the lower settlements, and there is less variety from here on up. Tengboche has only five hotels.



Pheriche

Pheriche, located north of Dingboche, is a popular halt for hikers and climbers. In Pheriche, there is a modest hospital run by the Himalayan Rescue Association (HRA). There are a few dozen lodges in Pheriche since it is a popular acclimatization stop before continuing on to higher elevations at Gorak Shep. There are no trees this far up in the valley; instead, there are tiny, hardy grasses and other tundra flora that hide the view of the adjacent mountains.

 

Duglha

Duglha, or Thukla as it is known locally, is the last spot where you will see tea huts until you reach Lobuche, which is 330 meters further up the mountain. The community is made up of a few residences strewn along the route and a dozen or so lodges that are the perfect location to stop for lunch if you're heading to Lobuche for the night.

The lodges for people staying overnight are relatively modest, and most are simply extensions of the family's home that have been converted into tourist guesthouses. Because the families live within the lodges thus high in the mountains, it may get a bit raucous in the evening before everyone has gone to bed. The food is very simple, with few western meals and several kinds of Dahl Bhat, which will appeal to you with its satisfying consistency and hearty tastes.

 

Lobuche

Lobuche is mostly a hotel village. Apart from the high-end hotels, however, lodging in this area is fairly modest and might be difficult to locate during peak season. There is a camping spot to the southwest of Lobuche for individuals wishing to climb the Lobuche Peak or for those who have their own tents. Tents are not required here since, during peak seasons, there are tent hotels in the camping area that serve all types of trekkers and climbers. The lodges in the community are fairly modest, both in terms of appearance and amenities. Many of them are notably rustic, typically consisting of stone cottages with communal bunk dorms.

In recent years, additional contemporary facilities and amenities have been added, including seven newly-built lodges with approximately 200 twin-bed rooms. Some lodges even provide internet access and oxygen, albeit the internet is sluggish and pricey. Food in Lobuche is better than in the past since porters are bringing more supplies up the path to suit the newer lodges.

 

Gorak Shep

Gorak Shep is home to the last five lodges or motels before reaching Everest Base Camp. Always packed, the accommodations are quite modest, and you should not be shocked if you have to share a room with other hikers or sleep in the dining area. Although it would be warmer in the dining room for a short while till the fire went out. This frozen lakebed coated in the sand is the final outpost before EBC and serves as a rest station for anybody climbing Everest. This raises the question of why there are only five lodges.

In the 1950s, Gorak Shep was the original base camp for climbers before shifting closer to the mountain's base, directly below the notorious Khumbu Ice Fall. Due to limited space, the lodge is a popular hangout for trekkers, guides, and porters in the evening and is busier than other lodges on the route. The rooms are chilly at night, and the toilet water is frequently frozen. The cuisine, on the other hand, is better than at many other spots along the route, and old favorites like pizza rolls and chicken curries are back. Prices, however, differ thus far up the mountain. Because the expense of carrying goods is substantially greater, the meals are much more costly than everywhere else on the path. If money is tight, it is best to carry your own dry and packed meals.

 

Accommodation, Food, and Services in 3 Passes Trek

The accommodation, food, and services offered on the Everest Three Passes journey are comparable to those found on the remainder of the EBC path. The majority of the routes in the region provide the same selection of tea shops, lodges, and luxury hotels. Thame, Lundeng, Gokyo, Thagnak, Dzongla, and Chhukung are all distinct rest stops on the three-pass hike. All of these feature simple tea shops and mid-range lodges. There are fewer lodges in Chhukung, Dzongla, and Thagnak. It would not be a major issue because these areas are not very populated. During busy hiking seasons, they might still fill up quickly. The cost and quality of meals and lodging are equivalent to those found in Dingboche and Lobuche.

 

Accommodation, Food, and Services in Gokyo Lakes Trek

One of the Everest region's side adventures is the Gokyo Lakes hike. You can also reach Everest Base Camp by traversing the Cho La route through the Gokyo Lakes. Some of the routes intersect with the three-pass trip. To accommodate trekkers stops like Dole and Machhermo feature hotels and tea houses. Gokyo features a considerable number of lodges and guest homes. Trekkers from the three passes and the Gokyo route meet at Gokyo. As a result, hotels in Gokyo may get rather crowded, as it is also an acclimatization site where hikers stay for two nights. Other locations will have a relatively low number of trekkers on this route, so you will not have trouble finding lodging. However, peak season will remain congested. Even during the busiest seasons, the booking will assure your spot.

 

Accommodation, Food, and Services in EBC trek from Jiri

This version of the Everest expedition will begin in Jiri. From Kathmandu, take a bus to Jiri. This alternate Solu route goes through Bhandar, Sete, Junbesi, Nunthala, Bhupsa, and Surke. Finally, at Chheplung, it links with the main EBC path near Lukla. The size and services of the hotels and lodges from Jiri to Phakding vary, but they all offer similar amenities at comparable pricing. It is far less expensive to pay for hotels, meals, and other services. They charge USD 1 to 2 for accommodation and generate money by offering meals, which is also less expensive than the site above Lukla. In comparison to high-altitude lodgings, you can obtain a hot shower, boiling water, and charging electronics for free or at a low cost.

 

Accommodation, Food, and Services in EBC trek from Salleri/Phaplu

You may fly or drive from Kathmandu to Phaplu, or take a bus to Salleri and connect with the Jiri-Phakding trail. The Phaplu to Everest Base Camp Trek travels via Kharikhola, Thamedanda, and Puiyan before rejoining the path near Phakding at Chheplung. The lodges and tea houses are nicely furnished and less expensive than the lodges on the way from Jiri. The path is shorter than walking from Jiri, and you will be able to rejoin the main trail sooner. Because most trekkers begin their journey in Lukla, both of these paths are calmer and less congested.




Final Thoughts

Whether you're going on a budget or prefer luxury, you'll discover the perfect lodging to suit your needs on your Everest Base Camp journey.

However, keep in mind that during peak hiking season, scheduling ahead of time is typically required.

Finally, make your hotel reservations as soon as possible!!! Of course, good spots will fill up quickly!!!

 

I know I keep saying it, but it is crucial. Begin looking for accommodations as soon as you know your dates. This will not only reduce your tension, but it will also help you get better prices on lodging.

If you are unsure about booking, you may simply speak with your trekking agency. They will assist you in making early reservations and obtaining the finest one!!

You'll have no trouble designing your EBC vacation to meet your needs with so many fantastic lodgings to select from!!!!!

It's time to start preparing!!!